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  • Acetaminophen, a common human drug used to control pain and fever, is toxic in dogs. Acetaminophen is occasionally recommended by veterinarians and should only be given under their direction. Young and small dogs have a higher risk for toxicity.  

  • Acetazolamide is a diuretic used off label and given by mouth to treat glaucoma or alkalosis. The most common side effect is stomach upset, but other side effects of the central nervous system, blood, kidneys, electrolytes, blood sugar levels, liver, or skin are possible. Do not use this medication in pets with liver or kidney disease, or low sodium or potassium blood levels. Use with caution in pets with acidosis, diabetes, pregnancy or lactation. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Acetylcysteine is given by mouth, injection, or topically and is used on and off label to treat toxicities or to break up mucus. It is usually a prescription, but some forms may be found over the counter. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is an upset stomach. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Canine acne is an inflammatory disorder of the lips and the skin of the muzzle. Dogs with mild cases of acne often have red bumps or pustules on their skin. This can, in more severe cases, lead to generalized swelling of the lips and muzzle, bleeding wounds, or scabs on the face. Commonly affected breeds include Boxers, English Bulldogs, Great Danes, German Shorthaired Pointers, and others. A variety of treatments are available and depend on the underlying cause of the acne.

  • Acupuncture is one aspect of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) that focuses on restoring the energy balance in the body to promote healing. The technique requires the insertion of fine needles into the dog’s body at specified points, called acupuncture points, where nerves and blood vessels converge. It is often used to treat dogs with arthritis and joint inflammation and may reduce the amount of medication a dog needs for these conditions. This handout explains how the treatment works and what to expect when your pet sees a veterinary acupuncturist.

  • Acute caudal myopathy results from overuse of the tail, causing a strain or sprain of the muscle groups used for tail wagging. Possible scenarios leading to limber tail include hard/vigorous play within the previous 24 hours, prolonged swimming, or active hunting within the past few days. The tail may droop limply between your dog's rear legs, or it may stick straight out behind him for a short distance before drooping. Uncomplicated acute caudal myopathy is treated with rest and anti-inflammatory medication.

  • Acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (AHDS) (also known as hemorrhagic gastroenteritis [HGE]), is an acute disorder of dogs characterized by vomiting and bloody diarrhea. AHDS can affect any breed, age, size, or gender of dog, but it is most common in small- and toy-breed dogs. The exact cause of AHDS remains unknown. An elevated hematocrit in combination with a low or normal total protein is an important clue that a dog may have AHDS. Intravenous fluid therapy with potassium and electrolyte supplementation provides the foundation of AHDS therapy. Dogs with AHDS may die, if left untreated.

  • Acute renal failure (ARF) or acute kidney failure refers to the sudden failure of the kidneys to perform normal filtration duties. ARF leads to accumulation of toxins and other metabolic wastes in the bloodstream, dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and disturbances in the acid-base balance of the blood. The initial prognosis is guarded for all cases of ARF. If the cause is an infection, there is a better prognosis than if the cause is a toxic substance.

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, also known as shock lung, is a life-threatening complication of critical illness in cats, such as systemic infection or disease, severe trauma, or near-drowning. Treatment involves targeting the underlying cause while also supporting the cat's compromised lung function with the use of an oxygen cage, an oxygen line direct to the cat's nasal passages, or in severe cases, a mechanical ventilator. Unfortunately, the prognosis for this condition is poor.

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, also known as shock lung, is a life-threatening complication of critical illness in dogs, such as systemic infection or disease, severe trauma, or near-drowning. Treatment involves targeting the underlying cause while also supporting the dog's compromised lung function with the use of an oxygen cage, an oxygen line direct to the dog's nasal passages, or in severe cases, a mechanical ventilator. Unfortunately, the prognosis for this condition is poor.

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Appointments recommended. For after hours emergencies call (325) 691-1504.